Strength for Christian Contentment

“What is Christian contentment? I would define it as a settled condition of peacefulness and happiness in whatever God has willed to be our portion. It is an act of faith, of trust in the sovereignty of God and in His essential goodness for us. It is a cheerful resignation to God’s superior wisdom, His higher plans and purposes. It rests entirely on God’s character and promises.” From Two Journeys…………… 

https://twojourneys.org/articles/detail/2616630/strength-for-christian-contentment/

God is Waiting for You—Dallas Willard

God is waiting for you. God is not pushy—for now, in any case. He is not going to overwhelm you if you don’t want Him. He gives you the power to put Him out of your mind. And even if you want Him, you have to seek Him. Now, I realize that there is a sense in which He is already seeking you, and I am not trying to dispose of that, but we misunderstand what is our part and what is God’s part. God is ready to act. He is acting. We are not waiting on Him; and if it doesn’t hurt your theology too badly, He is waiting on us to respond.From The Great Omission: Reclaiming Jesus’s Essential Teachings on Discipleship. Copyright © 2006 by Dallas Willard. All rights reserved. Used with permission of HarperCollins Publishers

4 Ways God Makes Himself Known Even When He Is Silent

This article serves as a good reminder that even if we feel like God is silent, He is not missing! From Crosswalk.com…………………

Jesus is the Key to Enter the Kingdom — Dallas Willard

Jesus is the key to God’s kingdom

To be sure, that [God’s] kingdom has been here as long as we humans have been here, and longer. But it has been available to us through simple confidence in Jesus, the Anointed, only from the time he became a public figure. It is a kingdom that, in the person of Jesus, welcomes us just as we are, just where we are, and makes it possible for us to translate our “ordinary” life into an eternal one. It is so available that everyone who from the center of his or her being calls upon Jesus as Master of the Universe and Prince of Life will be heard and will be delivered into the eternal kind of life.

From The Divine Conspiracy: Rediscovering Our Hidden Life in God. Copyright © 1997 by Dallas Willard. All rights reserved. Used with permission of HarperCollins Publishers

Knowledge and Faith Go Together — Dallas Willard

Knowledge and faith go together

We don’t have to look very far into our own thinking and living to see the effects of either being sure of God or not being sure of God. I believe that scripture always presents real faith as something that is based on knowledge as well as something that goes beyond anything you could know, and involves a commitment to God and his kingdom. Those two things, knowledge and commitment, are not exclusive of one another; rather, they are related. If we do not have a knowledge of God at the foundation of our commitment, that commitment simply will not hold up. It will waver; it will not govern our lives. It will be like pulling a chair away from someone in the act of sitting down. We will not be able to hold on to our belief as God intends, by the action of his Spirit on our hearts and our minds.Knowledge and faith are intended to go together.

For example, when you read Hebrews 11, the great chapter on faith, you will see faith equated with a vision of reality. We are told that Moses endured as one who sees the invisible. Faith is not a mere thought that something is true or the hope or resolve to believe it is. As Martin Luther said in the preface to his commentary on Romans: Faith is a living, well-founded confidence in the grace of God, so perfectly certain that it would die a thousand times rather than surrender its conviction. Such confidence and personal knowledge of divine grace makes its possessor joyful, bold, and full of warm affection toward God and all created things—all of which the Holy Spirit works in faith. Hence, such a man becomes without constraint willing and eager to do good to everyone, to serve everyone, to suffer all manner of ills, in order to please and to glorify God, who has shown toward him such grace. It is thus impossible to separate works from faith—yea, just as impossible as to separate burning and shining from fire.From The

Allure of Gentleness: Defending the Faith in the Manner of Jesus. Copyright © 2015 by Dallas Willard. All rights reserved. Used with permission of HarperCollins Publishers.

What is Joy? — Dallas Willard

What is Joy?

Joy is a positive outlook of hopefulness based upon a pervasive, overall sense of well-being. Joy, like love, has a “feeling” component that is pleasant. Yet joy, like love, is not a feeling. Joy maintains a positive posture in life that assumes that good will be supported and eventually triumph over any apparent obstacle. Therefore, joy is fully compatible with the experiences of pain, disappointment, or sorrow, because joyfulness always takes a wider view of circumstances and works with hope to expect good to prevail. Joy enables patience, faithfulness to commitments, and the all-important ability to defer instant gratification. Joy gives one the ability to say no, or perhaps a very firm “not yet,” to the immediacy of desire. Both responses are evidence of joy’s ability to overcome the tyranny of the urgent, since one is joyful with the present state of affairs, whatever that may be. The bearing of joy on the good life should be obvious. It is indispensable to steady contentment and perseverance in any task. Joy liberates from the demand or temptation of immediate satisfaction, which resists waiting for what is good or best. Accordingly, joy is the best platform from which to make any sound investment.

From The Divine Conspiracy Continued: Fulfilling God’s Kingdom on Earth. Copyright © 2014 by Dallas Willard amd Gary Black Jr. All rights reserved. Used with permission of HarperCollins Publishers.

Benefits of Practicing Solitude — Dallas Willard

Benefits of Practicing Solitude

Solitude well practiced will break the power of busyness, haste, isolation, and loneliness. You will see that the world is not on your shoulders after all. You will find yourself, and God will find you in new ways. Joy and peace will begin to bubble up within you and arrive from things and events around you. Praise and prayer will come to you and from within you. With practice, the “soul anchor” established in solitude will remain solid when you return to your ordinary life with others.

From The Great Omission: Reclaiming Jesus’s Essential Teachings on Discipleship. Copyright © 2006 by Dallas Willard. All rights reserved. Used with permission of HarperCollins Publishers.

All Who Are In the Kingdom of God are Blessed — Dallas Willard

All Are Blessed in the Kingdom of God

Jesus announced in the Beatitudes that even the most deprived and insignificant people on earth could be blessed by living in the kingdom: the poor, those who were grief-stricken, those without reputation or standing (the meek), and so forth. About them he said, “Blessed are they, for theirs is the kingdom of God” (Matt. 5:3–10; Luke 6:20–23). The blessedness was not in their condition of being poor, mournful, or disrespected. They were blessed because they could enter the kingdom, and to be in the kingdom means to be blessed no matter what else happens. They can rest in that. Their future in God is secured, and their present condition redeemed. Forever. No matter what.

From Knowing Christ Today: Why We Can Trust Spiritual Knowledge. Copyright © 2009 by Dallas Willard. All rights reserved. Used with permission of HarperCollins Publishers.



Theology of Work Bible Commentary: Jesus the Builder (Mark 6:1-6)

Most believers in North America (and, indeed, in all parts of the world) work in a secular environment for secular employers and with non-Christian work colleagues. As such, we all can learn a lot from the Bible on how to conduct ourselves in the workplace. Here is a brief lesson from Mark 6. From TheologyofWork.org…………………

A Half-Dozen of My Favorite Arguments for God

I am a firm believer in the thought that, even if one is not called to a ministry of apologetics, studying important aspects of apologetics for any believer will help to increase their faith and trust in God and the Bible, plus also get someone ready to answer any questions about God one may encounter on a day-by-day basis. So, this article does a really great job of summing up six of the most effective arguments for the existence of the God of the Bible. From FreeThinkingMinistries.com…………………..

The Resurrection’s Higher Math

This is a nice article from one of my favorite writers, Jared C. Wilson. Here, he points out how marvelous are God and His ways through an examination of Mark 12, where the Pharisees and Sadducees tried to stump Jesus in their question about who would the women be married to in heaven that had multiple husbands on earth. Interesting! From For The Church………………………

Your Personal Relationship with God Matters — Dallas Willard

Your Personal Relationship with God Matters

When people ask, “Why are you hopeful in the midst of this world, with all of the suffering and evil that goes on and all of the things that are happening to you?” they don’t want to hear merely about a great God. They don’t want to hear merely about redemptive history, an infallible book, or a covenant people who are a constant testimony to the real hand of God in history. They want to know what’s happening to you, what’s going on in your life. You are saying, “He is my fortress, he is my deliverer.” So they’re going to want to know when the last time he delivered you was. What does deliverance mean? How does this really work? Sharing the good news is often about sharing the personal good news of your life in Christ and not the abstract and generalized good news. They want to hear about your personal relationship to this personal God, who is the foundation of all of reality.

From The Allure of Gentleness: Defending the Faith in the Manner of Jesus. Copyright © 2015 by Dallas Willard. All rights reserved. Used with permission of HarperCollins Publishers.

Sometimes the Best Explanation Is ‘Forgive Me’

When we are confronted by another for an obvious sin toward them — like speaking harshly to a spouse or child — rather than give excuses and explanation, this article submits we should rather say, “Please forgive me.” From blogger Tanner Kay………………………..

How Can I Love the Bible When All I See Are Commands I Haven’t Obeyed?

If a follower of Jesus happens to be OCD regarding their salvation, or if they attend a legalistic church, then reading the Bible might be hard and depressing. But this brief article reminds believers that it is primarily through Scripture that they can become familiar with Jesus Christ, and then grow to see that God is loving and kind and merciful. From NavPress.com……………………….

3 Lessons From the Feeding of the 5000

This article does a great job in pulling together some lessons and insights from the miracle of feeding the 5000, mentioned in all of the gospels. From Stephen Bedard………

A sermon based on Luke 9:10-17 preached at Queen Street Baptist Church. Introduction How do we know when someone really means something? Usually they will repeat a statement more than once. Obviously it would be good if we took things seriously the first time. Unfortunately that doesn’t always happen. If I say something to my children […]

Source: 3 Lessons From the Feeding of the 5000